Oh! Domi No fx
this is a smile and a wink at the future
Oh! Domi No fx
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welcome to my wonderland;)
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red-lipstick:

Chris Berens (Hertogenbosch, Netherlands) - Come Along With Me, 2010      Paintings: Oil on Canvas

so amazingly surreal and impressive! this is pure love!
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little skunk love <3
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nybg:

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:


The scales of a butterfly resemble the very flower petals they tend to alight on. Or the scales of a fish. Depends on how poetic you’re feeling.Can’t wait to see the lepidoptera returning to the Perennial Garden for warmer months. —MN
nybg:

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:


The scales of a butterfly resemble the very flower petals they tend to alight on. Or the scales of a fish. Depends on how poetic you’re feeling.Can’t wait to see the lepidoptera returning to the Perennial Garden for warmer months. —MN
nybg:

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:


The scales of a butterfly resemble the very flower petals they tend to alight on. Or the scales of a fish. Depends on how poetic you’re feeling.Can’t wait to see the lepidoptera returning to the Perennial Garden for warmer months. —MN
nybg:

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:


The scales of a butterfly resemble the very flower petals they tend to alight on. Or the scales of a fish. Depends on how poetic you’re feeling.Can’t wait to see the lepidoptera returning to the Perennial Garden for warmer months. —MN
nybg:

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:


The scales of a butterfly resemble the very flower petals they tend to alight on. Or the scales of a fish. Depends on how poetic you’re feeling.Can’t wait to see the lepidoptera returning to the Perennial Garden for warmer months. —MN
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supersonicart:

Llew Mejia.
Illustrations by Llew Mejia (Previously on Supersonic):
Read More

love!
supersonicart:

Llew Mejia.
Illustrations by Llew Mejia (Previously on Supersonic):
Read More

love!
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eatsleepdraw:

Space Potatoes Reproduce by Bonding
© Ryan Schultz, 2014. 

i’m not sure i know what i’m looking at, but I really like it!
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mothernaturenetwork:

Dog’s bond with owner similar to a child’s need for a parentAccording to a recent study, the ‘secure base effect’ that exists between parents and children is also present in owner-dog bonding.

heartwarming. no wonder we talk to our animals in baby voices
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birdandmoon:

I love salamanders, so I made this photo comic.
help out here: http://PARCplace.org
(Original is on my site here.)

lovelovelove
birdandmoon:

I love salamanders, so I made this photo comic.
help out here: http://PARCplace.org
(Original is on my site here.)

lovelovelove
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startwithaseed:

wanderblog:

treehugger:

The Nourishmat comes with everything you need to start growing organic vegetables: seeds, fertilizer and know-how.

The mats last about 5 years and are printed with nontoxic ink that won’t leach into the soil.
The mats use a technique called square foot gardening. “The key is planting in grids instead of rows so you can maximize your space,” said Weiner. “More food in less space. We adapted the layout of the Nourishmat based on this popular method. We say natural because it embraces the idea of bio-diversity.” This method requires less water and fertilizer then conventional monoculture farming.
The square-foot method also makes plants into beneficial neighbors. “The layout of the plants revolves around companion planting,” said Weiner. “For example, the bugs that like marigolds are the same bugs that love to eat the bugs that love to eat tomatoes.”

This looks a lot like my fall/winter garden layout.

COOL!
startwithaseed:

wanderblog:

treehugger:

The Nourishmat comes with everything you need to start growing organic vegetables: seeds, fertilizer and know-how.

The mats last about 5 years and are printed with nontoxic ink that won’t leach into the soil.
The mats use a technique called square foot gardening. “The key is planting in grids instead of rows so you can maximize your space,” said Weiner. “More food in less space. We adapted the layout of the Nourishmat based on this popular method. We say natural because it embraces the idea of bio-diversity.” This method requires less water and fertilizer then conventional monoculture farming.
The square-foot method also makes plants into beneficial neighbors. “The layout of the plants revolves around companion planting,” said Weiner. “For example, the bugs that like marigolds are the same bugs that love to eat the bugs that love to eat tomatoes.”

This looks a lot like my fall/winter garden layout.

COOL!
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nybg:

slowartday:

Lyndie Dourthe

Because living terrariums with their impressive lifespans still don’t offer the security of near-permanence, this batch is composed of faux flowers; sewn, stuffed mushrooms; and at least one florally inspired human heart. —MN

coool! i love terrariums;)
nybg:

slowartday:

Lyndie Dourthe

Because living terrariums with their impressive lifespans still don’t offer the security of near-permanence, this batch is composed of faux flowers; sewn, stuffed mushrooms; and at least one florally inspired human heart. —MN

coool! i love terrariums;)
nybg:

slowartday:

Lyndie Dourthe

Because living terrariums with their impressive lifespans still don’t offer the security of near-permanence, this batch is composed of faux flowers; sewn, stuffed mushrooms; and at least one florally inspired human heart. —MN

coool! i love terrariums;)
nybg:

slowartday:

Lyndie Dourthe

Because living terrariums with their impressive lifespans still don’t offer the security of near-permanence, this batch is composed of faux flowers; sewn, stuffed mushrooms; and at least one florally inspired human heart. —MN

coool! i love terrariums;)
nybg:

slowartday:

Lyndie Dourthe

Because living terrariums with their impressive lifespans still don’t offer the security of near-permanence, this batch is composed of faux flowers; sewn, stuffed mushrooms; and at least one florally inspired human heart. —MN

coool! i love terrariums;)
nybg:

slowartday:

Lyndie Dourthe

Because living terrariums with their impressive lifespans still don’t offer the security of near-permanence, this batch is composed of faux flowers; sewn, stuffed mushrooms; and at least one florally inspired human heart. —MN

coool! i love terrariums;)